• Prime Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob said Malaysia also voiced its intention to play its role as a member of the UN-Habitat executive board representing the Asia Pacific so that the country’s involvement in sustainable cities can be prioritised.

KUALA LUMPUR (Aug 12): Malaysia will continue to support and cooperate with all UN-Habitat-sponsored programmes, aimed at coordinating programmes and activities related to human settlements and ensuring a quality living environment can be achieved.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob (pictured) said Malaysia also voiced its intention to play its role as a member of the UN-Habitat executive board representing the Asia Pacific so that the country’s involvement in sustainable cities can be prioritised.

“UN-Habitat is also committed to work with the Housing and Local Government Ministry in the aspects of training, capacity development and reporting preparation regarding the progress of Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) implementation at the local level and the need for accreditation and certification for cities that achieve their sustainability targets,” he said in a Facebook post on Friday.

He also said that UN-Habitat executive director Datuk Seri Maimunah Mohd Sharif, a Malaysian and the first Asian woman in that position, had paid a courtesy call at his office in Putrajaya on Friday.

The Prime Minister said the government believes that UN-Habitat will continue to excel in implementing SDG-related programmes and activities under Maimunah’s leadership and will expand the implementation of the New Urbanisation Agenda as a current global agenda.

Maimunah was first appointed to the position on Jan 20, 2018 after winning the election during the UN General Assembly on Dec 22, 2017, and had her tenure extended for a second term from Jan 20, 2022 till Jan 19, 2024.

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