• "Since 1983, the interconnector has enabled mutual energy transfer between Singapore and Malaysia during times of power system disturbances. With the completion of the upgrading works in August this year (2022), the interconnector can now accommodate bidirectional electricity flows of around 1,000 megawatts between Malaysia and Singapore.”

KUALA LUMPUR (Oct 26): Malaysia and Singapore have completed the upgrading of the electricity interconnector between both countries to enable mutual energy transfer in times of power outage, Singapore's Energy Market Authority (EMA) said in a statement on Wednesday (Oct 26).

"Since 1983, the interconnector has enabled mutual energy transfer between Singapore and Malaysia during times of power system disturbances. With the completion of the upgrading works in August this year (2022), the interconnector can now accommodate bidirectional electricity flows of around 1,000 megawatts between Malaysia and Singapore.

"This is double its earlier capacity and has enhanced regional energy connectivity.

"In addition to mutual support, the interconnector is currently used for cross-border power trade under the Lao PDR-Thailand-Malaysia-Singapore Power Integration Project (LTMS-PIP). The LTMS-PIP imports up to 100 megawatts of renewable hydropower from Lao PDR to Singapore via Thailand and Malaysia using existing interconnections," the EMA said.

According to the EMA, which is a statutory board under Singapore's Ministry of Trade and Industry, the EMA announced the completion of the Malaysia-Singapore electricity interconnector upgrade at the ongoing Singapore International Energy Week event.

Low-carbon electricity imports will be a crucial component of Singapore's power market. The EMA said on its website that on Oct 25, 2021, the EMA announced that two requests for proposal would be issued for up to a total of four gigawatts of low-carbon electricity imports into Singapore by 2035, as part of Singapore's efforts to enhance energy security by diversifying energy supply sources.

"This is expected to make up around 30% of Singapore's electricity supply in 2035.

"The remaining supply will continue to come from various sources, ranging from the current natural gas-fired power plants to solar and waste-to-energy sources," the EMA said.

To prepare for future electricity imports, the EMA said it has been working with various partners over the last two years on trials to import electricity.

The trials allow the EMA to assess and refine the technical and regulatory frameworks for importing electricity into Singapore, according to the EMA.

According to the EMA, the trials include the 100 MW electricity imports trial from Peninsular Malaysia and LTMS-PIP.

On the 100 MW electricity imports trial from Peninsular Malaysia, the EMA said it issued a request for proposal (RFP) on March 5, 2021 to appoint an electricity importer for the trial to import and sell up to 100 MW of electricity in Singapore via the existing interconnector between Singapore and Peninsular Malaysia over a period of two years.

"The RFP closed on June 30, 2021 and EMA has appointed YTL PowerSeraya Pte Ltd as the importer for the 100 MW electricity imports trial from Peninsular Malaysia (starting from 2022)," the EMA said.

Meanwhile, the LTMS-PIP marks a historic milestone as the first multilateral cross-border electricity trade involving four Asean countries, and the first renewable energy import into Singapore, according to the EMA.

"The LTMS-PIP successfully commenced on June 23, 2022. Under this project, up to 100 MW of renewable hydropower will be traded from Lao PDR to Singapore via Thailand and Malaysia using existing interconnections," the EMA said.

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