• Residents who live in secluded developments may not have to endure these youthful disport but it can really impact the life quality of those unable to avoid the throttle roars.

This commentary first appeared in the newsletter weekly property round-up of May 26

Quiet, tranquil and peaceful – these qualities rank high for homeseekers and are rightly among the main selling points for housing developments that can provide such.

On the other hand, we have “easily accessible” and “strategically located” developments, and often, the unspoken inconvenience these come with is the drone from the highways and busy thoroughfares they are sited near to. 

While this may have been accepted as part and parcel of urban living, what crosses the line is the din from illegal racers. Whether they be the infamous Mat Rempits in their modified motorcycles or the more well-heeled in their souped-upped cars, they cause the twin problems of unnecessary noise pollution and the endangerment to themselves and to other road users.

It is therefore quite interesting to hear the ex-prime minister Datuk Seri Ismail Sabri Yaakob, through a statement, asking the Ministry of Youth and Sports to reconsider “the construction of a drag racing circuit in every state”.

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Proceed with construction of drag racing circuits, says Ismail Sabri

He was responding to Youth and Sports Minister Hannah Yeoh’s reply to a question from a fellow MP in Parliament, where the former said the ministry has no plan to build the circuits as they would incur high maintenance costs.

Ismail Sabri revealed that the previous government had already proposed the idea with an allocation of RM20 million. He added the move was to allow youths to be more seriously involved in motorsports through proper channels.

Residents who live in secluded developments may not have to endure these youthful disport but it can really impact the life quality of those unable to avoid the throttle roars.

Worse still, most of these races occur deep in the night till the wee morning hours and during weekends – when most of us are home and hope to get some peace and quiet.

And there is of course the safety issue. The distressing case of the Sam Ke Ting basikal lajak is definitely still fresh in the minds of many.

Yes, the case involved youngsters in bicycles but the premise is the same – the modified bicycles and their users should not be on the road, just as illegal racers should not be using the highways for their energy outlet. Maybe the drag racing circuits can also reserve slots for these cycling racers too.

Whether Ismail Sabri’s suggestion is taken or not, we hope something will be done to turn these potential, kinetic, chemical and mechanical energies to better-appreciated sporting activity instead of an unwanted cacophony.

After all, tranquility and serenity is the basis of our wellbeing and should be rightly accorded to every citizen, be they living in the sanctuaries or cities.

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